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Robert Schumann
Suggested Reading



"The age of mutual compliments is gradually sinking into its grave. Frankly, we are not minded to assist its resurrection. He who does not attack the bad, defends the good but halfway. -- Our purpose... is to remind our readers emphatically of the distant past and its works. Then, to emphasize the fact that the contemporary artist can secure strength for the creation of new beauty only by drinking from such pure fountains. Then, to attack as inartistic the immediate past, which is concerned merely with encouraging superficial virtuosity. Lastly, to help prepare and hasten the coming of a new poetic era."

Robert Schumann : Herald of a 'New Poetic Age'
(John Daverio )
This well-researched study of Schumann interprets the composer's creative legacy in the context of his life and times, combining nineteenth-century cultural and intellectual history with a fascinating analysis of the works themselves.

Schumann and His World
(Bard Music Festival; Larry Todd, Editor)
We know Robert Schumann in many ways: as a visionary composer, a seasoned journalist, a cultured man of letters, and a genius who, having passed his mantle on to the young Brahms, succumbed to mental illness in 1856. Drawing on recent pathbreaking research, this collection offers new perspectives on this seminal nineteenth-century figure. In Part I, Leon Botstein and Michael P. Steinberg assess Schumann's efforts to place music at the center of German culture, in public and private sectors. Bernhard R. Appel offers a probing source study of one of Schumann's most personal works, the Album fr die Jugend, Op. 68, while John Daverio considers the generic identity of Das Paradies und die Peri, and Jon W. Finson reexamines the first version of the Eichendorff Liederkreis. Gerd Nauhaus investigates Schumann's approach to the symphonic finale, and R. Larry Todd considers the intractable issue of quotations and allusions in Schumann's music. Part II presents letters and memoirs, including unpublished correspondence between Clara Schumann and Felix and Paul Mendelssohn-Bartholdy. In Part III, conflicting critical views of Schumann are juxtaposed. Some of these sources are translated into English for the first time.

The Complete Correspondence of Clara and Robert Schumann
(Eva Weissweiler, editor)
The second volume of the Schumann correspondence contains letters written by Robert Schumann (1810 1856) and Clara Wieck Schumann (1819 1896) in 1839, documenting the major events of that year: Clara's concert tour and stay in Paris, Friedrich Wieck's continued vehement oppposition to Robert's courtship of his daughter, Clara and Robert's legal action to obtain the court's consent for their marriage, Clara's reunion and stay with her mother in Berlin, and the death of Robert's brother Eduard.

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