HumanitiesWeb.org - "A Tale from Decameron" by John William Waterhouse [Selected Works]
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A Tale from Decameron

1916: Lady Lever Art Gallery at Birkenhead

"In these tales will be found a variety of love adventures, bitter as well as pleasing, and other exciting incidents, which took place in both ancient and modern times. In reading them, the aforesaid ladies will be able to derive, not only pleasure from the entertaining matters therein set forth, but also some useful advice. For they will learn to recognize what should be avoided, and likewise what should be pursued, and these things can only lead, in my opinion, to the removal of their affliction. If this should happen (and may God grant that it should), let them give thanks to Love, which, in freeing me from its bonds, has granted me the power of making provision for their pleasure."

This was an excerpt from The Decameron. The Decameron was written by Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375). It is the story of seven young women and three young men who escaped the Black Plague of 1348 by taking refuge in the countryside. For ten days they entertained each other by telling stories; one story per person each day, 100 in all. You can read the entire text on-line.

 
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