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Henry I, Beauclerc
Suggested Reading



England and Its Rulers, 1066-1272: With an Epilogue on Edward I (1272-1307)
(M. T. Clanchy)
England and its Rulers has established itself as an attractive and authoritative account of English history from 1066. It brings the chronicle sources to life and makes original assessments of the kings and political events. Examining a period in which England was dominated by successive waves of foreign rulers, the book emphasizes how the Norman Conquest was followed by the Angevin Empire and then by the Poitevin ministers and favorites brought in by King John and Henry III. The identity of English culture is analyzed in the light of these strong external influences.This new edition retains the characteristics of the widely-acclaimed original, but it now includes an epilog on Edward I (1272-1307), which considers his wars in Wales and Scotland and reassesses his character and achievements. The second edition also contains a new bibliography covering all aspects of English history in the period 1066-1307.

Henry I (The English Monarchs Series)
(C. Warren Hollister)
This engrossing biography, written by one of the most distinguished medievalists of his generation, paints a new portrait of Henry I, son of William the Conqueror. Not the brutal, greedy, and repressive king that has been supposed, Henry was the ultimate pragmatist and a man of keen intelligence who desired peace, C. Warren Hollister shows. He vividly describes Henry's life and reign in a time of fundamental change in the Anglo-Norman world.

Henry I : King of England and Duke of Normandy
(Judith Green)
Judith Green argues that although Henry's primary concern was defence of his inheritance, it did not preclude expansion where circumstances were propitious, notably into Welsh territory. His skillful dealings with the Scots permitted consolidation of Norman rule in the northern counties of England, while in Normandy every sinew was strained to defend frontiers through political alliances and stone castles. Green claims that although Henry's own outlook was essentially traditional, the legacy of this fascinating but repellent personality included some hugely significant developments in governance.

The Government of England Under Henry I
(Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Fourth Series)
This is the first full-length analysis of the machinery and men of government under Henry I, which looks in much greater detail than is possible for other contemporary states at the way government worked and at the careers of royal servants. The early twelfth century was a major period of growth in English government apart from the royal household. Royal justice was vigorously administered, setting precedents for the later development of common law. At the local level the powerful sheriffs were kept under control, though aristocratic influence over the office survived. Government provided new opportunities in administration, and it is possible to identify a number of men who were effectively professional administrators. The book will therefore become essential reading on the reign of Henry I and on the general development of English government in the twelfth century.

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