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26 June, 2013

Regarding U.S.Grant

by Chester Alan Arthur

Whereas in His inscrutable wisdom it has pleased God to remove from us the illustrious head of the nation, James A. Garfield, late President of the United States; and

Whereas it is fitting that the deep grief which fills all hearts should manifest itself with one accord toward the throne of infinite grace, and that we should bow before the Almighty and seek from Him that consolation in our affliction and that sanctification of our loss which He is able and willing to vouchsafe:

Now, therefore, in obedience to sacred duty and in accordance with the desire of the people, I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States of America, do hereby appoint Monday next, the 26th day of September—on which day the remains of our honored and beloved dead will be consigned to their last resting place on earth—to be observed throughout the United States as a day of humiliation and mourning; and I earnestly recommend all the people to assemble on that day in their respective places of divine worship, there to render alike their tribute of sorrowful submission to the will of Almighty God and of reverence and love for the memory and character of our late Chief Magistrate.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed,

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, the 22d day of September, A.D. 1881, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixth.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.
FOURTH ANNUAL MESSAGE.

December 1, 1884.

I recommend that in recognition of the eminent services of Ulysses S. Grant, late General of the armies of the United States and twice President of this nation, the Congress confer upon him a suitable pension.
EXECUTIVE MANSION, February 3, 1885.

To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I take especial pleasure in laying before Congress the generous offer made by Mrs. Grant to give to the Government, in perpetual trust, the swords and military (and civil) testimonials lately belonging to General Grant. A copy of the deed of trust and of a letter addressed to me by Mr. William H. Vanderbilt, which I transmit herewith, will explain the nature and motives of this offer.

Appreciation of General Grant's achievements and recognition of his just fame have in part taken the shape of numerous mementoes and gifts which, while dear to him, possess for the nation an exceptional interest.

These relics, of great historical value, have passed into the hands of another, whose considerate action has restored the collection to Mrs. Grant as a life trust, on the condition that at the death of General Grant, or sooner, at Mrs. Grant's option, it should become the property of the Government, as set forth in the accompanying papers. In the exercise of the option thus given her Mrs. Grant elects that the trust shall forthwith determine, and asks that the Government designate a suitable place of deposit and a responsible custodian for the collection.

The nature of this gift and the value of the relics which the generosity of a private citizen, joined to the high sense of public regard which animates Mrs. Grant, have thus placed at the disposal of the Government, demand full and signal recognition on behalf of the nation at the hands of its representatives. I therefore ask Congress to take suitable action to accept the trust and to provide for its secure custody, at the same time recording the appreciative gratitude of the people of the United States to the donors.

In this connection I may pertinently advert to the pending legislation of the Senate and House of Representatives looking to a national recognition of General Grant's eminent services by providing the means for his restoration to the Army on the retired list. That Congress, by taking such action, will give expression to the almost universal desire of the people of this nation is evident, and I earnestly urge the passage of an act similar to Senate bill No. 2530, which, while not interfering with the constitutional prerogative of appointment, will enable the President in his discretion to nominate General Grant as general upon the retired list.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR
DEED OF TRUST.

Whereas I, William H. Vanderbilt, of the city of New York, by virtue of a sale made under a judgment in a suit to foreclose a chattel mortgage in the supreme court of this State, in which I was plaintiff and Ulysses S. Grant defendant, which judgment was entered on the 6th day of December, 1884, and under an execution in another suit in said court between the same parties upon a judgment entered December 9, 1884, have become the owner of the property and the articles described in the schedule hereto annexed, formerly the property of Ulysses S. Grant:

Now, therefore, to carry out a purpose formed by me, and in consideration of $1 to me paid, I do hereby transfer and convey each and every one of the articles mentioned and itemized in the said schedule to Julia Dent Grant, to have and hold the same to her, her executors and administrators, upon the trust and agreement, nevertheless, hereby accepted and made by her, that on the death of the said Ulysses S. Grant, or previously thereto, at her or their option, the same shall become and be the property of the nation and shall be taken to Washington and transferred and conveyed by her and them to the United States of America.

In witness whereof the said William H. Vanderbilt and Julia Dent Grant have executed these presents, this 10th day of January, A.D. 1885.

Sealed and delivered in presence of—

W.H. VANDERBILT.
JULIA DENT GRANT.

Schedule of swords and medals, paintings, bronzes, portraits, commissions and addresses, and objects of value and art presented by various governments in the world to General Ulysses S. Grant.
Mexican onyx cabinet, presented to General Grant by the people of Puebla, Mexico.
Aerolite, part of which passed over Mexico in 1871.
Bronze vases, presented to General Grant by the Japanese citizens of Yokohama, Japan.
Marble bust and pedestal, presented by workingmen of Philadelphia.
General Grant and family, painted by Coggswell.
Large elephant tusks, presented by the King of Siam.
Small elephant tusks, from the Maharajah of Johore.
Picture of General Scott, by Page, presented by gentlemen of New York.
Crackleware bowls (very old), presented by Prince Koon, of China.
Cloisonne jars (old), presented by Li Hung Chang.
Chinese porcelain jars (old), presented by Prince Koon, of China.
Arabian Bible.
Coptic Bible, presented by Lord Napier, who captured it with King Theodore, of Abyssinia.
Sporting rifle.
Sword of Donelson, presented to General Grant after the fall of Fort Donelson, by officers of the Army, and used by him until the end of the war.
New York sword, voted to General Grant by the citizens of New York at the fair held in New York.
Sword of Chattanooga, presented to General Grant by the citizens of Jo Daviess County, Ill. (Galena), after the battle of Chattanooga.
Roman mug and pitcher.
Silver menu and card, farewell dinner of San Francisco, Cal.
Silver menu of Paris dinner.
Horn and silver snuff box.
Silver match box, used by General Grant.
Gold table, modeled after the table in Mr. McLean's house on which General R.E. Lee signed the articles of surrender. This was presented to General Grant by ex-Confederate soldiers.
Gold cigar case (enameled), presented by the Celestial King of Siam.
Gold cigar case (plain), presented by the Second King of Siam.
Gold-handled knife, presented by miners of Idaho Territory.
Nine pieces of jade stone, presented by Prince Koon, of China.
Silver trowel, used by General Grant in laying the corner stone of the American Museum of Natural History, New York.
Knife, made at Sheffield for General Grant.
Gold pen, General Grant's.
Embroidered picture (cock and hen), presented to General Grant by citizens of Japan.
Field glasses, used by General Grant during the war.
Iron-headed cane, made from the rebel ram Merrimac.
Silver-headed cane, made from wood used in the defense of Fort Sumter.
Gold-headed cane, made out of wood from old Fort Du Quesne, Pa.
Gold-headed cane, presented to General Grant as a tribute of regard for his humane treatment of the soldiers and kind consideration of those who ministered to the sick and wounded during the war.
Gold-headed cane, used by General Lafayette, and presented to General Grant by the ladies of Baltimore, Md.
Carved wood cane, from the estate of Sir Walter Scott.
Uniform as general of the United States Army.
Fifteen buttons, cut from the coats during the war by Mrs. Grant after the different battles.
Hat ornament, used at Belmont.
Hat ornament, used at Fort Donelson.
Shoulder straps (brigadier-general), worn by General Grant at Belmont, Fort Donelson, and Shiloh.
Shoulder straps (lieutenant-general), cut from the coat used by General Grant in the campaigns against Richmond and Petersburg and Lee's army.
Shoulder straps (lieutenant-general), cut from General Grant's coat.
Pair of shoulder straps (general), cut from a coat General Grant used after the war.
Medal from the American Congress (gold) for opening the Mississippi.
Gold medal, from Philadelphia.
Twenty-one medals (gold, silver, and bronze), badges of armies and corps.
Ten medals (silver and bronze), sent to General Grant at different times.
Fourteen medals (bronze), in memory of events.
Silk paper (Louisville Commercial), printed for General Grant.
Silk paper (Daily Chronicle), printed for General Grant.
Silk paper (Burlington Hawkeye), printed for General Grant.
Collection of coin (Japanese). This is the only complete set, except one which is in the Japanese treasury. Seven of these pieces cost $5,000. This set was presented by the Government of Japan.
Warrant as cadet at West Point.
Commission, brevet second lieutenant (missing).
Commission, second lieutenant (missing).
Commission, brevet first lieutenant (missing).
Commission as first lieutenant, United States Army.
Commission as brevet captain, United States Army.
Commission as captain, United States Army.
Commission as colonel of volunteers.
Commission as brigadier-general.
Commission as major-general.
Commission as major-general, United States Army.
Commission as lieutenant-general, United States Army.
Commission as general, United States Army.
Commission as honorary member of M.L.A., San Francisco.
Commission as member of Sacramento Society of Pioneers.
Commission as honorary member Royal Historical Society.
Commission as Military Order of Loyal Legion.
Commission as member of the Aztec Club.
Certificate of election President of the United States.
Certificate of reelection President of the United States.
Certificate of honorary membership Territorial Pioneers of California.
Certificate of honorary membership St. Andrew's Society.
Certificate of election LL. D., Harvard College.
Certificate of election honorary membership of the Sacramento Society.
Certificate of Pioneers of California.
Certificate of election honorary member Mercantile Library, San Francisco.
Freedom of the city of Dublin, Ireland.
Freedom of the city of Stratford-on-Avon.
Freedom of the city of London, England.
Freedom of the city of Glasgow, Scotland.
Freedom of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland.
Freedom of the city of Ayr, Scotland.
Freedom of the burgh of Inverness, Scotland.
Freedom of the city of Oakland, America.
Freedom of the city of San Francisco, America.
Freedom of the city of Londonderry, Ireland.
The freedom of many other cities.
Address to General Grant from the Chamber of Commerce, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1877.
Address to General Grant from the mayor, aldermen, and citizens of the city of Manchester, England, May 13, 1877.
Address to General Grant by the workingmen of Birmingham, England, October 16, 1877.
Address to General Grant from the Chamber of Commerce and Board of Trade, San Francisco, Cal., September, 1879.
Address to General Grant by mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Gateshead, England.
Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, magistrates, aldermen, and councilors of the borough of Leicester, England.
Address to General Grant by the Americans of Shanghai, China, May 19, 1879.
Address to General Grant by the Calumet Club, of Chicago, Ill.
Address to General Grant from the Society of Friends in Great Britain.
Address to General Grant from Chamber of Commerce of Penang.
Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Southampton, England.
Address to General Grant by the provost, magistrates, and town council of the royal borough of Stirling.
Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of Tynemouth, England.
Address to General Grant by the mayor and town council of Sunderland.
Address to General Grant by the trade and friendly societies of Sunderland.
Address to General Grant by the public schools of Louisville, Ky.
Address to General Grant by the colored men of Louisville, Ky.
Address to General Grant by ex-Confederate soldiers.
Address to General Grant by the State of Louisiana.
Address to General Grant by the Chamber of Commerce and Board of Trade of San Francisco, Cal.
Address to General Grant by the British workmen of London, England.
Address to General Grant by the North Shields Shipowners' Society, England.
Address to General Grant by the Chamber of Commerce, Sheffield, England.
Address to General Grant from mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of borough of Royal Leamington Spa, England.
Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of Sheffield, England.
Address to General Grant by wardens, etc., and commonalty of the town of Sheffield, England.
Address to General Grant from the provost, magistrates, and town council of the city and royal burgh of Elgin, Scotland.
Address to General Grant from the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Folkestone, England.
Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of the borough of Jarrow, England.
Address to General Grant by the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses of Gateshead, England.
Address to General Grant from the Carpenters' Company.
Address to General Grant from the citizens of Cincinnati, congratulating him on his second election as President of the United States.
Address to General Grant from the citizens of Nagasaki, Japan.
Resolutions of the Territorial Pioneers, admitting General Grant to membership.
Resolution of the Caledonian Club, of San Francisco, enrolling General Grant as an honorary member.
Resolutions of the citizens of Jo Daviess County, presenting a sword to General Grant (sword of Chattanooga).
Resolutions of the Washington Camp, of Brooklyn, Long Island.
First resolutions of thanks of the Congress of the United States.
First resolutions inviting General Grant to visit the house of representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Second resolutions of thanks from the Congress of the United States.
Letter from citizens of Jersey City thanking General Grant for his Des Moines, Iowa, speech on the question of public schools.
Presentation of a silver medal by the Union League Club, of Philadelphia, for gallantry and distinguished services.
Vote of thanks by Congress to General U.S. Grant, etc.
Other resolutions, addresses, votes of thanks, and freedom of cities.
640 FIFTH AVENUE, January 20, 1885.

His Excellency CHESTER A. ARTHUR,
President of the United States.

DEAR SIR: I purchased the articles of historical interest belonging to General Grant and gave them to Mrs. Grant in trust to hold during the lifetime of the General, and at his death, or sooner, at her option, they to become the property of the Government. They consist of his swords, memorials of his victories from the United States, States, and cities, and tributes to his fame and achievements from governments all over the world. In their proper place at Washington they will always be secure and will afford pleasure and instruction to succeeding generations. This trust has been accepted by Mrs. Grant, and the disposition of the articles is in conformity to the wishes of the General. I transmit to you herewith the deed of trust. Mrs. Grant informs me that she prefers to close the trust at once and send the memorials to Washington. May I ask, therefore, that you will designate some official, representing the proper Department, to receive them, and direct him to notify Mrs. Grant of the arrangements necessary to perfect the transfer and deposit in such of the Government buildings as may be most suitable?

Yours, respectfully,

W.H. VANDERBILT
EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 3, 1885.

To the Senate of the United States:

I nominate Ulysses S. Grant, formerly commanding the armies of the United States, to be general on the retired list of the Army, with the full pay of such rank.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR
Personae

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