HumanitiesWeb.org - Thomas Jefferson - the Sage of Monticello [According To...]
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Thomas Jefferson
According To...



"This angel, as gaudily painted in the rhapsodies of the Rhetor Burke, with some smartness of fancy, but no sound sense was proud, disdainful of restraint, indignant at all obstacles to her will, eager in the pursuit of pleasure, and firm enough to hold to her desires, or perish in their wreck. Her inordinate gambling and dissipations, with those of the Count d'Artois and others of her clique, had been a sensible item in the exhaustion of the treasury, which called into action the reforming hand of the nation; and her opposition to it her inflexible perverseness, and dauntless spirit, led herself to the Guillotine, & drew the king on with her, and plunged the world into crimes & calamities which will forever stain the pages of modern history. I have ever believed that had there been no queen, there would have been no revolution. "

"Mr. Jefferson loves to excite wonder."
- John Quincy Adams
 
"Thomas Jefferson survives."
- John Adams Last words - he didn't know that Jefferson had died a few hours earlier.