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George Gordon, Lord Byron
Hours of Idleness



BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE TO 'HOURS OF IDLENESS AND OTHER EARLY POEMS'.

There were four distinct issues of Byron's Juvenilia. The first
collection, entitled 'Fugitive Pieces', was printed in quarto by S. and
J. Ridge of Newark. Two of the poems, "The Tear" and the "Reply to Some
Verses of J. M. B. Pigot, Esq.," were signed "BYRON;" but the volume
itself, which is without a title-page, was anonymous. It numbers
sixty-six pages, and consists of thirty-eight distinct pieces. The last
piece, "Imitated from Catullus. To Anna," is dated November 16, 1806.
The whole of this issue, with the exception of two or three copies, was
destroyed. An imperfect copy, lacking pp. 17-20 and pp. 58-66, is
preserved at Newstead. A perfect copy, which had been retained by the
Rev. J. T. Becher, at whose instance the issue was suppressed, was
preserved by his family (see 'Life', by Karl Elze, 1872, p. 450), and is
now in the possession of Mr. H. Buxton Forman, C.B. A facsimile reprint
of this unique volume, limited to one hundred copies, was issued, for
private circulation only, from the Chiswick Press in 1886.

Of the thirty-eight 'Fugitive Pieces', two poems, viz. "To Caroline" and
"To Mary," together with the last six stanzas of the lines, "To Miss E.
P. [To Eliza]," have never been republished in any edition of Byron's
Poetical Works.

A second edition, small octavo, of 'Fugitive Pieces', entitled 'Poems on
Various Occasions', was printed by S. and J. Ridge of Newark, and
distributed in January, 1807. This volume was issued anonymously. It
numbers 144 pages, and consists of a reproduction of thirty-six
'Fugitive Pieces', and of twelve hitherto unprinted poems--forty-eight
in all. For references to the distribution of this issue--limited, says
Moore, to one hundred copies--see letters to Mr. Pigot and the Earl of
Clare, dated January 16, February 6, 1807, and undated letters of the
same period to Mr. William Bankes and Mr. Falkner ('Life', pp. 41, 42).
The annotated copy of 'Poems on Various Occasions', referred to in the
present edition, is in the British Museum.

Early in the summer (June--July) of 1807, a volume, small octavo, named
'Hours of Idleness'--a title henceforth associated with Byron's early
poems--was printed and published by S. and J. Ridge of Newark, and was
sold by the following London booksellers: Crosby and Co.; Longman,
Hurst, Rees, and Orme; F. and C. Rivington; and J, Mawman. The full
title is, 'Hours of Idleness; a Series of Poems Original and
Translated'. By George Gordon, Lord Byron, a Minor. It numbers 187
pages, and consists of thirty-nine poems. Of these, nineteen belonged to
the original 'Fugitive Pieces', eight had first appeared in 'Poems on
Various Occasions', and twelve were published for the first time. The
"Fragment of a Translation from the 9th Book of Virgil's ∆neid"
('sic'), numbering sixteen lines, reappears as "The Episode of Nisus and
Euryalus, A Paraphrase from the ∆neid, Lib. 9," numbering 406 lines.

The final collection, also in small octavo, bearing the title 'Poems
Original and Translated', by George Gordon, Lord Byron, second edition,
was printed and published in 1808 by S. and J. Ridge of Newark, and sold
by the same London booksellers as 'Hours of Idleness'. It numbers 174
pages, and consists of seventeen of the original 'Fugitive Pieces', four
of those first published in 'Poems on Various Occasions', a reprint of
the twelve poems first published in 'Hours of Idleness', and five poems
which now appeared for the first time--thirty-eight poems in all.
Neither the title nor the contents of this so-called second edition
corresponds exactly with the previous issue.

Of the thirty-eight 'Fugitive Pieces' which constitute the suppressed
quarto, only seventeen appear in all three subsequent issues. Of the
twelve additions to 'Poems on Various Occasions', four were excluded
from 'Hours of Idleness', and four more from 'Poems Original and
Translated'.

The collection of minor poems entitled 'Hours of Idleness', which has
been included in every edition of Byron's Poetical Works issued by John
Murray since 1831, consists of seventy pieces, being the aggregate of
the poems published in the three issues, 'Poems on Various Occasions',
'Hours of Idleness', and 'Poems Original and Translated', together with
five other poems of the same period derived from other sources.

In the present issue a general heading, "Hours of Idleness, and other
Early Poems," has been applied to the entire collection of Early Poems,
1802-1809. The quarto has been reprinted (excepting the lines "To Mary,"
which Byron himself deliberately suppressed) in its entirety, and in the
original order. The successive additions to the 'Poems on Various
Occasions', 'Hours of Idleness', and 'Poems Original and Translated',
follow in order of publication. The remainder of the series, viz. poems
first published in Moore's 'Life and Journals of Lord Byron' (1830);
poems hitherto unpublished; poems first published in the 'Works of Lord
Byron' (1832), and poems contributed to J. C. Hobhouse's 'Imitations and
Translations' (1809), have been arranged in chronological order. (For an
important contribution to the bibliography of the quarto of 1806, and of
the other issues of Byron's Juvenilia, see papers by Mr. R. Edgcumbe,
Mr. H. Buxton Forman, C.B., and others, in the 'Athenaeum', 1885, vol.
ii. pp. 731-733, 769; and 1886, vol. i. p. 101, etc. For a collation of
the contents of the four first issues and of certain large-paper copies
of 'Hours of Idleness', etc., see 'The Bibliography of the Poetical
Works of Lord Byron', vol. vi. of the present edition.)


[text of facsimile pages of two different editions mentioned above:]

HOURS OF IDLENESS,

A SERIES OF POEMS,
ORIGINAL AND TRANSLATED,

BY GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON,

A MINOR.


[Greek: Maet ar me mal ainee maete ti neichei.]

                                  HOMER. Iliad, 10.


Virginibus puerisque Canto.

                            HORACE.


He whistled as he went for want of thought.

                                      DRYDEN.



NEMARK:

Printed and sold by S. and J. RIDGE;

SOLD ALSO BY B CROSBY AND CO. STATIONER'S COURT;
LONGMAN, HURST, REES, AND ORME, PATERNOSTER-ROW;
F. AND C. RIVINGTON, ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD;
AND J. MAWMAN, IN THE POULTRY;
LONDON.
1807







POEMS
ORIGINAL AND TRANSLATED
BY
GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON,


[Greek: Maet ar me mal ainee maete ti neichei.]

HOMER, Iliad, 10.


He whistled as he went for want of thought.

DRYDEN.



Fugitive Pieces
On Leaving Newstead Abbey
To E---
On the Death of a Young Lady,
To D---
To Caroline
To Caroline
To Emma
Fragments of School Exercises:
Lines
Answer to the Foregoing,
On a Change of Masters at a Great Public School
Epitaph On A Beloved Friend
Adrian's Address To His Soul When Dying
A Fragment
To Caroline.
To Caroline
On A Distant View
Thoughts Suggested By A College Examination.
To Mary,
On the Death of Mr. Fox,
To A Lady
To A Beautiful Quaker.
To Lesbia!
To Woman.
An Occasional Prologue,
To Eliza
The Tear.
Reply To Some Verses Of J. M. B. Pigot, Esq.,
Granta. A Medley.
To The Sighing Strephon
The Cornelian
To M----
Lines Addressed To A Young Lady.
Translation From Catullus. Ad Lesbiam.
Translation of the Epitaph on Virgil and Tibullus, by Domitius Marsus.
Imitation of Tibullus. Sulpicia Ad Cerinthum (Lib. Quart.).
Translation from Catullus. Lugete Veneres Cupidinesque (Carm. III.)
Imitated from Catullus. To Ellen.

Poems On Various Occasions
To M. S. G.
Stanzas To A Lady, With The Poems Of CamoŽns.
To M. S. G.
Translation From Horace.
The First Kiss Of Love.
Childish Recollections.
Answer To A Beautiful Poem, Written By Montgomery,
Love's Last Adieu.
Lines. Addressed To The Rev. J. T. Becher,
Answer To Some Elegant Verses Sent By A Friend To The Author,
Elegy On Newstead Abbey.

Hours Of Idleness
To George, Earl Delawarr.
Damśtas.
To Marion.
Oscar Of Alva.
Translation From Anacreon.
From Anacreon.
The Episode Of Nisus And Euryalus.
Translation From The "Medea" Of Euripides [Ll. 627-660].
Lachin Y Gair.
To Romance.
The Death Of Calmar And Orla.
To Edward Noel Long, Esq.
To A Lady.

Poems Original and Translated
When I Roved A Young Highlander.
To The Duke Of Dorset.
To The Earl Of Clare.
I Would I Were A Careless Child.
Lines Written Beneath An Elm In The Churchyard Of Harrow.

Early Poems from Various Sources
Fragment. Written Shortly After The Marriage Of Miss Chaworth.
Remembrance.
To A Lady
To A Knot Of Ungenerous Critics.
Soliloquy Of A Bard In The Country.
L'amitiť, Est L'amour Sans Ailes.
The Prayer Of Nature.
Translation From Anacreon.
Ossian's Address To The Sun In "Carthon."
Pignus Amoris.
A Woman's Hair.
Stanzas To Jessy.
The Adieu.
To----
On the Eyes of Miss A----H----
To A Vain Lady.
To Anne.
Egotism. A Letter To J. T. Becher.
To Anne.
To The Author Of A Sonnet
On Finding A Fan.
Farewell To The Muse.
To An Oak At Newstead.
On Revisiting Harrow.
To My Son.
Queries To Casuists.
Song.
To Harriet.
There Was A Time, I Need Not Name.
And Wilt Thou Weep When I Am Low?
Remind Me Not, Remind Me Not.
To A Youthful Friend.
Lines Inscribed Upon A Cup Formed From A Skull.
Well! Thou Art Happy.
Inscription On The Monument Of A Newfoundland Dog.
To A Lady,
Fill The Goblet Again.
Stanzas To A Lady, On Leaving England.
Personae

Terms Defined

Referenced Works