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Mark Twain
Suggested Reading



"The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them."

Mark Twain and Bret Harte
(Margaret Duckett)


Mark Twain's America
(Bernard Augustine De Voto, M. J. Gallagher (Illustrator), Bernard Devoto, Louis J. Budd)
Bernard DeVoto (1897-1955) is one of the great poets of American history; he was a man who allowed the American land to shape his sweeping narratives. This overlooked book, first published in 1932, celebrates the places Mark Twain knew and wrote about, and it celebrates as well Twain's humor and disenchantment. "Twain laughs," writes DeVoto, "and, for the first time, American literature possesses tragic laughter." The tragedy comes, of course, from the darker moments of the continent's conquest, to several of which Twain was an unflinching witness. To read DeVoto is to see with Twain's own eyes the great rivers, mining camps, mountains, and forests of America a century ago.

Mark Twain: An Illustrated Biography
(Geoffrey C. Ward, Dayton Duncan, Ken Burns, Russell Banks )
A lavishly illustrated companion book to the Mark Twain PBS series

The Autobiography of Mark Twain
(Charles Neider (Author))
Mark Twain was a figure larger than life: massive in talent, eruptive in temperament, unpredictable in his actions. He crafted stories of heroism, adventure, tragedy, and comedy that reflected the changing America of the time, and he tells his own story--which includes sixteen pages of photos--with the same flair he brought to his fiction. Writing this autobiography on his deathbed, Twain vowed to he "free and frank and unembarrassed" in the recounting of his life and his experiences.

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