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The Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin
Chapter IX: Slaves as they are, on Testimony of Owners.

by Harriet Beecher Stowe

The investigation into the actual condition of the slave population at the South is beset with many difficulties. So many things are said pro and con--so many said in one connexion and denied in another--that the effect is very confusing.

Thus we are told that the state of the slaves is one of blissful contentment; that they would not take freedom as a gift; that their family relations are only now and then invaded; that they are a stupid race, almost sunk to the condition of animals; that generally they are kindly treated, &c.

In reading over some two hundred Southern newspapers this fall, the author has been struck with the very graphic and circumstantial pictures, which occur in all of them, describing fugitive slaves. From these descriptions one may learn a vast many things. The author will here give an assortment of them taken at random. It is a commentary on the contented state of the slave population that the writer finds two or three always, and often many more, in every one of the hundreds of Southern papers examined.

In reading the following little sketches of "slaves as they are," let the reader notice:

1. The colour and complexion of the majority of them.

2. That it is customary either to describe slaves by some scar, or to say, "No scars recollected."

3. The intelligence of the parties advertised.

4. The number that say they are free that are to be sold to pay jail fees.

Every one of these slaves has a history--a history of woe and crime, degradation, endurance, and wrong. Let us open the chapter.

South-side Democrat, October 28, 1852. Petersburgh, Virginia:--

REWARD.

Twenty-five dollars, with the payment of all necessary expenses, will be given for the apprehension and delivery of my man CHARLES, if taken on the Appomattox river, or within the precincts of Petersburgh. He ran off about a week ago, and if he leaves the neighbourhood, will no doubt make for Farmville and Petersburgh. He is a mulatto, rather below the medium height and size, but well proportioned, and very active and sensible. He is aged about 27 years, has a mild, submissive look, and will, no doubt, show the marks of a recent whipping if taken. He must be delivered to the care of Peebles, White, Davis, & Co.

Oct. 25.--3t. R. H. DE JARNETT, Lunenburgh.

Poor Charles!--mulatto!--has a mild, submissive look, and will probably show marks of a recent whipping!

Kosciusko Chronicle, November 24, 1852:

COMMITTED

To the Jail of Attila County, on the 8th instant, a negro boy, who calls his name GREEN, and says he belongs to James Gray, of Winston County. Said boy is about 20 years old, yellow complexion, round face, has a scar on his face, one on his left thigh, and one in his left hand: is about 5 feet 6 inches high. Had on when taken up a cotton check shirt, Linsey pants, new cloth cap, and was riding a large roan horse about 12 or 14 years old, and thin in order. The owner is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be sold to pay charges.

E. B. SANDERS, Jailer A. C.

Oct. 12, 1852. n12tf.

Capitolian Vis-à-Vis, West Baton Rouge, Nov. 1, 1852.

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

RUNAWAY from the subscriber, in Randolph County, on the 18th of October, a yellow boy, named JIM. This boy is 19 years old, a light mulatto with dirty sunburnt hair inclined to be straight; he is just 5 feet 7 inches high, and slightly made. He had on when he left a black cloth cap, black cloth pantaloons, a plaided sack coat, a fine shirt, and brogan shoes. One hundred dollars will be paid for the recovery of the above-described boy, if taken out of the State, or fifty dollars if taken in the State.

Mrs. S. P. HALL, Huntsville, Mo.

Nov. 4, 1852.

American Baptist, Dec. 20, 1852:

TWENTY DOLLARS REWARD FOR A PREACHER.

The following paragraph, headed "Twenty Dollars Reward," appeared in a recent number of the New Orleans Picayune:

"Runaway from the plantation of the undersigned the negro man Shedrick, a preacher, 5 feet 9 inches high, about 40 years old, but looking not over 23, stamped N. E. on the breast, and having both small toes cut off. He is of a very dark complexion, with eyes small but bright, and a look quite insolent. He dresses good, and was arrested as a runaway at Donaldsonville, some three years ago. The above reward will be paid for his arrest, by addressing Messrs. Armant Brothers, St. James parish, or A. Miltenberger & Co., 30, Carondelet-street."

Here is a preacher who is branded on the breast and has two toes cut off--and will look insolent yet! There's depravity for you!

Jefferson Inquirer, Nov. 27, 1852:

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

RAN AWAY from my plantation, in Bolivar County, Miss., a negro man named MAY, aged 40 years, 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, copper coloured, and very straight; his front teeth are good and stand a little open; stout through the shoulders, and has some scars on his back that show above the skin plain, caused by the whip; he frequently hiccups when eating, if he has not got water handy; he was pursued into Ozark County, Mo., and there left. I will give the above reward for his confinement in jail, so that I can get him.

JAMES H. COUSAR, Victoria, Bolivar County, Mississippi.

Nov. 13, lm.

Delightful master to go back to, this man must be!

The Alabama Standard has for its motto, "RESISTANCE TO TYRANTS IS OBEDIENCE TO GOD."

Date of Nov. 29th, this advertisement:

COMMITTED

To the Jail of Choctaw County, by Judge Young, of Marengo County, a RUNAWAY SLAVE, who calls his name BILLY, and says he belongs to the late William Johnson, and was in the employment of John Jones, near Alexandria, La. He is about 5 feet 10 inches high, black, about 40 years old, much scarred on the face and head, and quite intelligent.

The owner is requested to come forward, prove his property, and take him from jail, or he will be disposed of according to law.

S. S. HOUSTON, Jailer, C. C.

Dec. 1, 1852. 44 tf.

Query: whether this "quite intelligent" Billy hadn't been corrupted by hearing this incendiary motto of the Standard?

Knoxville (Tennessee) Register, Nov. 3rd:

LOOK OUT FOR RUNAWAYS! TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD!

RANAWAY from the subscriber, on the night of the 26th July last, a negro woman named HARRIET. Said woman is about 5 feet 5 inches high, has prominent cheek-bones large mouth and good front teeth, tolerably spare built, about 26 years old. We think it probable she is harboured by some negroes not far from John Mynatt's in Knox County, where she and they are likely making some arrangements to get to a free State: or she may be concealed by some negroes (her connexions) in Anderson County, near Clinton. I will give the above reward for her apprehension and confinement in any prison in this State, or I will give fifty dollars for her confinement in any jail out of this State, so that I get her.

Nov. 3. 4m. H. B. GOENS, Clinton, Tenn.

The Alexandria Gazette, November 29, 1852, under the device of Liberty trampling on a tyrant, motto, Sic "semper tyrannis," has the following:

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

Ranaway from the subscriber, living in the County of Rappahannock, on Tuesday last, DANIEL, a bright mulatto, about 5 feet 8 inches high, about 35 years old, very intelligent, has been a waggoner for several years, and is pretty well acquainted from Richmond to Alexandria. He calls himself DANIEL TURNER; his hair curls without showing black blood, or wool; he has a scar on one cheek, and his left hand has been seriously injured by a pistol-shot, and he was shabbily dressed when last seen. I will give the above reward if taken out of the county, and secured in jail, so that I get him again, or ten dollars if taken in the county.

A. M. WILLIS.

Rappahannock Co., Va., Nov. 29.--eo lm.

Another "very intelligent," straight-haired man. Who was his father?

The New Orleans Daily Crescent, office, No. 93, St. Charles-street; Tuesday morning, December 13, 1852:

BROUGHT TO THE FIRST DISTRICT POLICE PRISON.

NANCY, a griffe, about 34 years old, 5 feet 1¾ inch high, a scar on left wrist; says she belongs to Madame Wolf.

CHARLES HALL, a black, about 18 years old, 5 feet 6 inches high; says he is free, but supposed to be a slave.

PHILOMONIA, a mulattress, about 10 years old, 4 feet 3 inches high; says she is free, but supposed to be a slave.

COLUMBUS, a griffe, about 21 years old, 5 feet 5¾ inches high; says he is free, but supposed to be a slave.

SEYMOUR, a black, about 21 years old, 5 feet 1¾ inch high; says he is free, but supposed to be a slave.

The owners will please to comply with the law respecting them.

J. WORRALL, Warden.

New Orleans, Dec. 14, 1852.

What chance for any of these poor fellows who say they are free?

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, living in Unionville, Frederick County, Md., on Sunday morning, the 17th instant, a DARK MULATTO GIRL, about 18 years of age, 5 feet 4 or 5 inches high, looks pleasant generally, talks very quick, converses tolerably well, and can read. It is supposed she had on, when she left, a red Merino dress, black Visette or plaid Shawl, and a purple calico Bonnet, as those articles are missing.

A reward of Twenty-five Dollars will be given for her, if taken in the State, or Fifty Dollars if taken out of the State, and lodged in jail, so that I get her again.

Oct. 13.--2m. G. R. SAPPINGTON.

Kosciusko Chronicle, Mississippi:

TWENTY DOLLARS REWARD,

Will be paid for the delivery of the boy WALKER, aged about 28 years, about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high, black complexion, loose make, smiles when spoken to, has a mild, sweet voice, and fine teeth. Apply at 25, Tchoupitoulas street, up stairs.

o12 6t.

Walker has walked off, it seems. Peace be with him!

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, living near White's Store, Anson County, on the 3rd of May last, a bright mulatto boy, named BOB. Bob is about 5 feet high, will weigh 130 pounds, is about 22 years old, and has some beard on his upper lip. His left leg is somewhat shorter than his right, causing him to hobble in his walk; has a very broad face, and will show colour like a white man. It is probable he has gone off with some waggoner or trader, or he may have free papers and be passing as a free man. He has straight hair.

I will give a reward of TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS for the apprehension and delivery to me of said boy, or for his confinement in any jail, so that I get him again.

CLARA LOCKHART, By Adam Lockhart.

June 30, 1852. 698: 5

Southern Standard, October 16, 1852:

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY, or stolen, from the subscriber, living near Aberdeen, Miss., a light mulatto woman, of small size, and about 23 years old. She has long, black, straight hair, and she usually keeps it in good order. When she left she had on either a white dress, or a brown calico one with white spots or figures, and took with her a red handkerchief, and a red or pink sun-bonnet. She generally dresses very neatly. She generally calls herself Mary Ann Paine--can read print--has some freckles on her face and hands--shoes No. 4--had a ring or two on her fingers. She is very intelligent, and converses well. The above reward will be given for her, if taken out of the State, and twenty-five dollars if taken within the State.

U. MC ALLISTER.

Memphis (weekly) Appeal will insert to the amount of five dollars, and send account to this office.

Oct. 6th, 1853. 20--tf.

Much can be seen of this Mary Ann in this picture. The black, straight hair, usually kept in order--the general neatness of dress--the ring or two on the fingers--the ability to read-- the fact of being intelligent and conversing well, are all to be noticed.

TWENTY DOLLARS REWARD.

Ranaway, on the 9th of last August, my servant boy HENRY: he is 14 or 15 years old, a bright mulatto, has dark eyes, stoops a little, and stutters when confused. Had on, when he went away, white pantaloons, long blue summer-coat, and a palm-leaf hat. I will give the above reward if he should be taken in the State of Virginia, or 30 dollars if taken in either of the adjoining States; but in either case he must be so secured that I get him again.

Oct. 7.--eotf. EDWIN C. FITZHUGH.

Poor Henry!--only 14 or 15.

COMMITTED

To the jail of Lowndes County, Mississippi, on the 9th of May, by Jno. K. Peirce, Esq., and taken up as a runaway slave by William S. Cox, a negro man, who says his name is ROLAND, and that he belongs to Maj. Cathey, of Marengo Co., Ala., was sold to him by Henry Williams, a negro trader from North Carolina.

Said Negro is about 35 years old, 5 feet 6 or 8 inches high, dark complexion, weighs about 150 pounds, middle finger on the right hand off at the second joint, and had on, when committed, a black silk hat, black drap d'été dress coat, and white linsey pants.

The owner is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be dealt with according to law.

L. H. WILLEFORD, Jailer.

June 6, 1852.--19--tf.

Richmond Semi-weekly Examiner, October 29, 1852:

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD.

Ranaway from the subscriber, residing in the County of Halifax, about the middle of last August, a Negro Man, Ned, aged some thirty or forty years, of medium height, copper colour, full forehead, and cheek bones a little prominent. No scars recollected, except one of his fingers--the little one probably--is stiff and crooked. The man Ned was purchased in Richmond, of Mr. Robert Goodwin, who resides near Frederick-Hall, in Louisa County, and has a wife in that vicinity. He has been seen in the neighbourhood, and is supposed to have gone over the Mountains, and to be now at work as a free man at some of the Iron Works; some one having given him free papers. The above reward will be given for the apprehension of the slave Ned, and his delivery to R. H. Dickinson and Bro., in Richmond, or to the undersigned, in Halifax, Virginia, or twenty-five if confined in any jail in the Commonwealth, so that I get him.

JAS. M. CHAPPELL, [Firm of Chappell& Tucker.]

Aug. 10.--tf

This unfortunate copper-coloured article is supposed to have gone after his wife.

Kentucky Whig, Oct. 22, '52:

TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

Ranaway from the subscriber, near Mount Sterling, Ky., on the night of the 20th of October, a negro man named PORTER. Said boy is black, about 22 years old, very stout and active, weighs about 165 or 170 pounds. He is a smart fellow, converses well without the negro accent; no particular scars recollected. He had on a pair of coarse boots about half-worn, no other clothing recollected. He was raised near Sharpsburg, in Bath county, by Harrison Caldwell, and may be lurking in that neighbourhood, but will probably endeavour to reach Ohio.

I will pay the above-mentioned reward for him, if taken out of the State; 50 dollars, if taken in any county bordering on the Ohio river; or 25 dollars, if taken in this or any adjoining county, and secured so that I can get him.

He is supposed to have ridden a yellow horse, 15 hands and one inch high, mane and tail both yellow, five years old, and paces well.

October 21st, 1852. G. W. PROCTOR.

"No particular scars recollected!"

St. Louis Times, Oct. 14, 1852:

NOTICE.

Taken up and committed to jail in the town of Rockbridge, Ozark county, Mo., on the 31st of August last, a runaway slave, who calls his name MOSES. Had on, when taken, a brown Jeanes pantaloons, old cotton shirt, blue frock-coat, an old rag tied round his head. He is about six feet high, dark complexion, a scar over the left eye, supposed to be about 27 years old. The owner is hereby notified to come forward, prove said negro, and pay all lawful charges incurred on his account, or the said negro will be sold at public auction, for ready money, at the Court House door in the town of Rockbridge, on MONDAY, the 13th December next, according to law in such cases made and provided, this 9th of September, 1852.

s23d & w. ROBERT HICKS, Sh'ff.

Charleston Mercury, Oct. 15, 1852.

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away on Sunday, the 6th inst., from the South Carolina Railroad Company, their negro man SAM, recently bought by them, with others, at Messrs. Cothran& Sproull's sale, at Aiken. He was raised in Cumberland County, North Carolina, and last brought from Richmond, Va. In height he is 5 feet 6¾ inches. Complexion copper colour; on the left arm and right leg somewhat scarred Countenance good. The above reward will be paid for his apprehension and lodgment in any one of the jails of this or any neighbouring State.

J. D. PETSCH. Sup't. Transportation.

June 12.

Kosciusko Chronicle, Nov. 24, '52.

COMMITTED

To the Jail of Attila County, Miss., October the 7th, 1852, a negro boy, who calls his name HAMBLETON, and says he belongs to Parson William Young, of Pontotoc County; is about 26 or 27 years old, about 5 feet 8 inches high, rather dark complexion, has two or three marks on his back, a small scar on his left hip. Had on, when taken up, a pair of blue cotton pants, white cotton drawers, a new cotton shirt, a pair of kip boots, an old cloth cap and wool hat. The owner is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be dealt with as provided in such case.

E. B. SANDERS, Jailer A. C.

Oct. 12, 1852. n 12tf.

Frankfort Commonwealth, October 21, 1852.

COMMITTED TO JAIL.

A Negro boy, who calls his name ADAM, was committed to the Muhlenburg Jail on the 24th of July, 1852. Said boy is black; about 16 or 17 years old; 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; will weigh about 150 lbs. He has lost a part of the finger next to his little finger on the right hand; also the great toe on his left foot. This boys says he belongs to Wm. Mosley; that said Mosley was moving to Mississippi from Virginia. He further states that he is lost, and not a runaway. His owner is requested to come forward, prove property, pay expenses, and take him away, or he will be disposed of as the law directs.

Greenville, Ky., Oct. 20, 1852. S. H. DEMPSEY, J. M. C.

RUNAWAY SLAVE.

A Negro man arrested and placed in the Barren County Jail, Ky., on the 21st instant, calling himself HENRY, about 22 years old; says he ran away from near Florence, Alabama, and belongs to John Calaway. He is about five feet eight inches high, dark, but not very black, rather thin visage, pointed nose, no scars perceivable, rather spare built; says he has been runaway nearly three months The owner can get him by applying and paying the reward and expenses; if not he will be proceeded against according to law. This 24th of August, 1852.

Aug. 25, 1852. SAMUELl ADWELL, Jailer.

In the same paper are two more poor fellows, who probably have been sold to pay jail-fees before now.

NOTICE.

Taken up by M. H. Brand, as a runaway slave, on the 22nd ult., in the city of Covington, Kenton County, Ky., a negro man calling himself CHARLES WARFIELD, about 30 years old, but looks older, about six feet high; no particular marks: had no free papers, but he says he is free, and was born in Pennsylvania, and in Fayette County. Said negro was lodged in jail on the said 22nd ult., and the owner or owners, if any, are hereby notified to come forward, prove property, and pay charges, and take him away.

Aug. 3, 1852.--6m. C. W. HULL, J. K. C.

COMMITTED

To the Jail of Graves County, Ky., on the 4th inst., a negro man calling himself DAVE or DAVID. He says he is free, but formerly belonged to Samuel Brown, of Prince William County, Virginia. He is of black colour, about five feet ten inches high, weighs about 180 lbs; supposed to be about 45 years old; had on brown pants and striped shirt. He had in his possession an old rifle gun, an old pistol, and some old clothing. He also informs me that he has escaped from the Dyersburg Jail, Tennessee, where he had been confined some eight or nine months. The owner is hereby notified to come forward, prove property, pay charges, &c.

June 28, 1852.--w6m. L. B. HOLEFELD, Jailer, G. C.

Charleston Mercury, Oct. 29, 1852.

TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber, some time in March last, his servant LYDIA, and is suspected of being in Charleston. I will give the above reward to any person who may apprehend her, and furnish evidence to conviction of the person supposed to harbour her, or fifty dollars for having her lodged in any jail so that I get her. Lydia is a Mulatto woman, twenty-five years of age, four feet eleven inches high, with straight black hair, which inclines to curl, her front teeth defective, and has been plugged; the gold distinctly seen, when talking; round face, a scar under her chin, and two fingers on one hand stiff at the first joint.

C. T. SCAIFE.

June 16.--tuths.

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber, on or about the first of May last, his negro boy GEORGE, about 18 years of age, about 5 feet high, well set, and speaks properly. He formerly belonged to Mr. J. D. A. Murphy, living in Blackville; has a mother belonging to a Mr. Lorrick, living in Lexington District. He is supposed to have a pass, and is likely to be lurking about Branchville or Charleston.

The above reward will be paid to any one lodging George in any Jail in the State, so that I can get him.

J. J. ANDREWS, Orangeburg C. H.

Orangeburg, Aug, 7, 1852. sw Sept. 11.

NOTICE.

Committed to the jail at Colleton District as a runaway, JORDAN, a negro man about thirty years of age, who says he belongs to Dobson Coely, of Pulaski, County, Georgia. The owner has notice to prove property and take him away.

L. W. MC CANTS, Sheriff Colleton Dist.

Waterboro', So. Ca., Sept. 7, 1852.

The following are selected by the Commonwealth, mostly from New Orleans papers. The characteristics of the slaves are interesting.

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

Will be paid by the undersigned for the apprehension and delivery to any jail in this city, of the negro woman MARIAH, who ran away from the Phoenix House about the 15th of October last. She is about 45 years old, 5 feet 4 inches high, stout built, speaks French and English. Was purchased from Chas. Deblanc.

H. BIDWELL & Co., 16, Front Levee.

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away about the 25th ult., ALLEN, a bright mulatto, aged about 22 years, 6 feet high, very well dressed, has an extremely careless gait, of slender build, and wore a moustache when he left; the property of J. P. Harrison, Esq., of this city. The above reward will be paid for his safe delivery at any safe place in the city. For further particulars apply at 10, Bank Place.

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

We will give the above reward for the apprehension of the light mulatto boy SEABOURN, aged 20 years, about 5 feet 4 inches high; is stout, well made, and remarkably active. He is somewhat of a circus actor, by which he may easily be detected, as he is always showing his gymnastic qualifications. The said boy absented himself on the 3rd instant. Besides the above reward, all reasonable expenses will be paid.

W. & H. STACKHOUSE, 70, Tchoupitoulas.

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

The above reward will be paid for the apprehension of the mulatto boy SEVERIN, aged 25 years, 5 feet 6 or 8 inches high; most of his front teeth are out, and the letters C. V. are marked on either of his arms with India ink. He speaks French, English, and Spanish, and was formerly owned by Mr. Courcell, in the Third District. I will pay, in addition to the above reward, 50 dollars for such information as will lead to the conviction of any person harbouring said slave.

JOHN ERMON, corner Camp and Race Sts.

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the Chain Gang in New Orleans, First Municipality, in February last, a negro boy named STEPHEN. He is about 5 feet 7 inches in height, a very light mulatto, with blue eyes and brownish hair, stoops a little in the shoulders, has a cast-down look, and is very strongly built and muscular. He will not acknowledge his name or owner, is an habitual runaway, and was shot somewhere in the ankle while endeavouring to escape from Baton Rouge Jail. The above reward, with all attendant expenses, will be paid on his delivery to me, or for his apprehension and commitment to any Jail from which I can get him.

A. L. BINAMAN.

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

The above reward will be given to the person who will lodge in one of the Jails of this city the slave SARAH, belonging to Mr. Guisonnet, corner St. John Baptiste and Race Streets; said slave is aged about 28 years, 5 feet high, benevolent face, fine teeth, and speaking French and English. Captains of vessels and steamboats are hereby cautioned not to receive her on board, under penalty of the law.

AVET BROTHERS, Corner Bienville and Old Levee Streets.

Lynchburg Virginian, Nov. 6th.

TWENTY DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, in the County of Withe, on the 20th of June, 1852, a negro man named CHARLES, 6 feet high, copper colour, with several teeth out in front, about 35 years of age, rather slow to reply, but pleasing appearance when spoken to. He wore, when he left, a cloth cap, and a blue cloth sack coat; he was purchased in Tennessee, 14 months ago, by Mr. M. Connell, of Lynchburg, and carried to that place, where he remained until I purchased him four months ago. It is more than probable that he will make his way to Tennessee, as he has a wife now living there; or he may perhaps return to Lynchburg, and lurk about there, as he has acquaintances there. The above reward will be paid if he is taken in the State and confined so that I get him again; or I will pay a reward of Forty dollars, if taken out of the State and confined in Jail.

July 1.--GEORGE W. KYLE.

Winchester Republican (Va.), Nov. 26.

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber near Culpepper, Ct. House, Va., about the 1st of October, a negro man named ALFRED, about five feet seven inches in height, about twenty-five years of age, uncommonly muscular and active, complexion dark but not black, countenance mild and rather pleasant. He had a boil last winter on the middle joint of the middle or second finger of the right hand, which left the finger stiff in that joint, more visible in opening his hand than in shutting it. He has a wife at Mr. Thomas G. Marshall's, near Farrowsville, in Fauquier County, and may be in that neighbourhood, where he wishes to be sold, and where I am willing to sell him.

I will give the above reward if he is taken out of the State, and secured so that I get him again; or 50 dollars if taken in the State, and secured in like manner.

October 29, 1852. W. B. SLAUGHTER.

From the Louisville Daily Journal, Oct. 23, 1852.

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

Run away from the subscriber in this city, on Friday, May 28th, a negro boy named WYATT. Said boy is copper coloured, 25 or 26 years old, about 5 feet 11 inches high, of large frame, slow and heavy gait, has very large hands and feet, small side whiskers, a full head of hair which he combs to the side, quite a pleasing look, and is very likely. I recently purchased Wyatt from Mr. Garrett, of Garrett's Landing, Ky, and his wife is the property of Thos. G. Rowland, Esq., of this city. I will pay the above reward for the apprehension and delivery of the boy to me if taken out of the State, or 50 dollars if taken in the State.

June DAVID W. YANDELL.

TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

TWO NEGROES. Ran away from the subscriber, living in Louisville, on the 2nd, one negro man and girl. The man's name is MILES. He is about 5 feet 8 inches high, dark brown colour, with a large scar upon his head, as if caused from a burn; age about 25 years; and had with him two carpet sacks, one of cloth, the other enamelled leather; also a pass from Louisville to Owenton, Owen County, Ky., and back. The girl's name is Julia, and she is of light brown colour, short and heavy set, rather good-looking, with a scar upon her forehead; had on a plaid silk dress when she left, and took other clothes with her; looks to be about 16 years of age.

The above reward will be paid for the man, if taken out of the State, or 100 dollars for the girl; 100 dollars for the man, if taken in the State, or 50 dollars for the girl. In either event they are to be secured, so I get them.

Oct. JOHN W. LYNN.

The following advertisements are all dated Shelby Co., Kentucky.

JAILER'S NOTICE.

Was committed to the jail of Shelby County a negro woman, who says her name is JUDA; dark complexion; twenty years of age; some five feet high; weighs about one hundred and twenty pounds: no scars recollected, and says she belongs to James Wilson, living in Denmark, Tennessee. The owner of said slave is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take her away, or she will be dealt with as the law directs.

Oct. 27--w4t. W. H. EANES, Jailer, Shelby County.

JAILER'S NOTICE.

Was committed to the jail of Shelby County, on the 28th ult., a negro boy, who says his name is JOHN W. LOYD; of a bright complexion, 25 years of age, will weigh about one hundred and fifty pounds, about five feet nine or ten inches high, three scars on his left leg, which were caused by a dog-bite. The said boy John claims to be free. If he has any master, he is hereby notified to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

Nov. 3--w4t.

ALSO--Committed at the same time a negro boy, who says his name is PATRICK; of a bright complexion, about 30 years of age, will weigh about one hundred and forty-five or fifty pounds; about six feet high; his face is very badly scarred, which he says was caused by being salivated. The disease caused him to lose the bone out of his nose, and his jaw-bone also. Says he belongs to Dr. Wm. Cheathum, living in Nashville, Tenn. The owner of said slave is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

Nov. 3--w4t.

ALSO--Committed at the same time a negro boy, who says his name is CLAIBORNE; dark complexion, 22 years of age, will weigh about one hundred and forty pounds, about five feet high; no scars recollected; says he belongs to Col. Rousell, living in De Soto County, Miss. The owner of said slave is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

Nov. 3--w4t .W. H. EANES, Jailer of Shelby County.

JAILER'S NOTICE.

Was committed to the jail of Shelby county a negro boy who says his name is GEORGE; dark complexion, about 25 or 30 years of age, some five feet nine or ten inches high, will weigh about one hundred and forty pounds, no scars, and says he belongs to Malley Bradford, living in Issaqueen County, Mississippi. The owner of said slave is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be dealt with as the law directs.

Nov. 10--w4t. W. H. EANES, Jailer of Shelby County.

JAILER'S NOTICE.

Was committed to the jail of Shelby County, on the 30th ult., a negro woman, who says her name is NANCY; of a bright complexion, some 20 or 21 years of age, will weigh about one hundred and forty pounds, about five feet high, no scars, and says she belongs to John Pittman, living in Memphis, Tenn. The owner of said slave is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take her away, or she will be dealt with as the law directs.

Nov. 10--w4t. W. H. EANES, Jailer of Shelby County.

Negro property is decidedly "brisk" in this county.

Natchez (Miss.) Free Trader, November 6, 1852.

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the undersigned, on the 17th day of October, 1852, a negro man, by the name of ALLEN, about 23 years old, near six feet high, of dark mulatto colour; no marks, save one, and that caused by the bite of a dog; had on, when he left, Lowell pants, and cotton shirt; reads imperfectly, can make a short calculation correctly, and can write some few words: said negro has run away heretofore, and when taken up was in possession of a free pass. He is quick-spoken, lively, and smiles when in conversation.

I will give the above reward to any one who will confine said negro in any jail so that I can get him.

THOS. R. CHEATHAM.

Nov. 6--3t.

Newberry Sentinel (S. C.), Nov. 17, 1852.

NOTICE.

RANAWAY from the subscriber, on the 9th of July last, my boy WILLIAM a bright mulatto, about 26 years old, 5 feet 9 or 10 inches high, of slender make quite intelligent, speaks quick when spoken to, and walks briskly. Said boy was brought from Virginia and will probably attempt to get back. Any information of said boy will be thankfully received.

JOHN M. MARS.

Near Mollohon P. O., Newberry Dist., S. C. Nov. 3 414t.

*Raleigh Register and Richmond Enquirer will copy four times weekly, and send bills to this office.

Greensboro' Patriot (N. C.), Nov. 6.

TEN DOLLARS REWARD.

RANAWAY from my service, in February, 1851, a coloured man named EDWARD WINSLOW low, thick-set, part Indian, and a first-rate fiddler. Said Winslow was sold out of Guilford jail, at February Court, 1851, for his prison charges, for the term of five years. It is supposed that he is at work on the Railroad, somewhere in Davidson county. The above reward will be paid for his apprehension and confinement in the jail of Guilford, or any of the adjoining counties, so that I get him, or for his delivery to me in the south-east corner of Guilford. My post-office is Long's Mills, Randolph, N. C.

P. C. SMITH.

October 27, 1852. 702--5w.

The New Orleans True Delta, of the 11th ult., 1853, has the following editorial notice:

THE GREAT RAFFLE OF A TROTTING HORSE AND A NEGRO SERVANT.-- The enterprising and go-a-head Col. Jennings has got a raffle under way now, which eclipses all his previous undertakings in that line. The prizes are the celebrated trotting-horse "Star," buggy and harness, and a valuable negro servant--the latter valued at nine hundred dollars. See his advertisement in another column.

The advertisement is as follows:

RAFFLE. MR. JOSEPH JENNINGS

Respectfully informs his friends and the public, that, at the request of many of his acquaintances, he has been induced to purchase from Mr. Osborn, of Missouri, the celebrated dark bay horse "Star," age five years, square trotter, and warranted sound, with a new light trotting Buggy and Harness; also the stout mulatto girl "Sarah," aged about twenty years, general house-servant, valued at nine hundred dollars, and guaranteed; will be raffled for at 4 o'clock, P.M., February 1st, at any hotel selected by the subscribers.

The above is as represented, and those persons who may wish to engage in the usual practice of raffling will, I assure them, be perfectly satisfied with their destiny in this affair.

Fifteen hundred chances, at one dollar each.

The whole is valued at its just worth, fifteen hundred dollars.

The raffle will be conducted by gentlemen selected by the interested subscribers present. Five nights allowed to complete the raffle. Both of above can be seen at my store, No. 78 Common-street, second door from Camp, at from 9 o'clock A.M. till half-past 2 P.M.

Highest throw takes the first choice; the lowest throw the remaining prize, and the fortunate winners to pay Twenty Dollars each for the refreshments furnished for the occasion.

Jan. 9--2w. J. JENNINGS.

Daily Courier (Natchez, Miss.,) Nov. 20, 1852.

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

THE above reward will be given for the apprehension and confinement in any jail of the negro man HARDY, who ran away from the subscriber, residing on Lake St. John, near Rifle Point, Concordia parish, La., on the 9th August last. Hardy is a remarkably likely negro, entirely free from all marks, scars or blemishes, when he left home; about six feet high, of black complexion (though quite light), fine countenance, unusually smooth skin, good head of hair, fine eyes and teeth.

Address the subscriber at Rifle Point, Concordia Parish, La.

Oct. 30.--1m. ROBERT Y. JONES.

What an unfortunate master!--lost an article entirely free from "marks, scars, or blemishes!" Such a rarity ought to be choice!

Savannah Daily Georgian, 6th Sept., 1852.

ARRESTED.

ABOUT three weeks ago, under suspicious circumstances, a negro woman, who calls herself PHEBE, or PHILLIS. Says she is free, and lately from Beaufort District, South Carolina. Said woman is about 50 years of age, stout in stature, mild-spoken, five feet four inches high, and weighs about 140 pounds. Having made diligent inquiry by letter, and from what I can learn, said woman is a runaway. Any person owning said slave can get her by making application to me, properly authenticated.

WARING RUSSELL, County Constable.

Savannah, Oct. 25, 1852.

Oct. 26.

TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD.

RAN AWAY from Sparta, Ga., about the first of last year, my boy GEORGE. He is a good carpenter, about 35 years; a bright mulatto, tall and quite likely. He was brought about three years ago from St. Mary's, and had, when he ran away, a wife there, or near there, belonging to a Mr. Holzendorff. I think he has told me he has been about Macon also. He had, and perhaps still has, a brother in Savannah. He is very intelligent. I will give the above reward for his confinement in some jail in the State, so that I can get him. Refer, for any further information, to Rabun and Whitehead, Savannah, Ga.

W. J. SASSNETT.

Oxford, Ga., Aug. 13, 1852.

tuths3m. a17.

From these advertisements, and hundreds of similar ones, one may learn the following things:--

1. That the arguments for the enslaving of the negro do not apply to a large part of the actual slaves.

2. That they are not, in the estimation of their masters, very stupid.

3. That they are not remarkably contented.

4. That they have no particular reason to be so.

5. That multitudes of men claiming to be free are constantly being sold into slavery.

In respect to the complexion of these slaves, there are some points worthy of consideration. The writer adds the following advertisements, published by Wm. I. Bowditch, Esq., in his pamphlet, "Slavery and the Constitution."

From the Richmond (Va.) Whig:--

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD

WILL be given for the apprehension of my negro (?) Edmund Kenney. He has straight hair, and complexion so nearly white that it is believed a stranger would suppose there was no African blood in him. He was with my boy Dick a short time since in Norfolk, and offered him for sale, and was apprehended, but escaped under pretence of being a white man!

January 6, 1836. ANDERSON BOWLES.

From the Republican Banner and Nashville Whig of July 14, 1849:--

TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

RAN AWAY from the subscriber, on the 23rd of June last, a bright mulatto woman, named Julia, about 25 years of age. She is of common size, nearly white, and very likely. She is a good seamstress, and can read a little. She may attempt to pass for white--dresses fine. She took with her Anna, her child, 8 or 9 years old, and considerably darker than her mother... She once belonged to a Mr. Helm, of Columbia, Tennessee.

I will give a reward of 50 dollars for said negro and child, if delivered to me or confined in any jail in this State, so I can get them; 100 dollars if caught in any other slave State, and confined in a jail so that I can get them; and 200 dollars if caught in any free State, and put in any good jail in Kentucky or Tennessee, so I can get them.

Nashville, July 9, 1849. A. W. JOHNSON.

The following three advertisements are taken from Alabama papers:--

RAN AWAY

From the subscriber, working on the plantation of Col. H. Tinker, a bright mulatto boy, named Alfred. Alfred is about 18 years old, pretty well grown, has blue eyes, light flaxen hair, skin disposed to freckle. He will try to pass as free-born.

Green County, Ala. S. G. STEWART.

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber, a bright mulatto man-slave, named Sam. Light, sandy hair, blue eyes, ruddy complexion--is so white as very easily to pass for a free white man.

Mobile, April 22, 1837. EDWIN PECK.

RAN AWAY,

On the 15th of May, from me, a negro woman, named Fanny. Said woman is 20 years old; is rather tall; can read and write, and so forge passes for herself. Carried away with her a pair of ear-rings--a Bible with a red cover; is very pious. She prays a great deal, and was, as supposed, contented and happy. She is as white as most white women, with straight light hair, and blue eyes, and can pass herself for a white woman. I will give 500 dollars for her apprehension and delivery to me. She is very intelligent.

Tuscaloosa, May 29, 1845. JOHN BALCH.

From the Newbern (N. C.) Spectator:--

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD

Will be given for the apprehension and delivery to me of the following slaves:-- Samuel, and Judy his wife, with their four children, belonging to my estate of Sacker Dubberly, deceased.

I will give 10 dollars for the apprehension of William Dubberly, a slave belonging to the estate. William is about 19 years old, quite white, and would not readily be taken for a slave.

JOHN J. LANE.

March 13, 1837.

The next two advertisements we cut from the New Orleans Picayune of Sept. 2, 1846:--

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the plantation of Madame Fergus Duplantier, on or about the 27th of June, 1846, a bright mulatto, named Ned, very stout built, about 5 feet 11 inches high, speaks English and French, about 35 years old, waddles in his walk. He may try to pass himself for a white man, as he is of a very clear colour, and has sandy hair. The above reward will be paid to whoever will bring him to Madame Duplantier's plantation, Manchac, or lodge him in some jail where he can be conveniently obtained.

TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

Ran away from the subscriber, last November, a white negro man, about 35 years old, height about 5 feet 8 or 10 inches, blue eyes, has a yellow woolly head, very fair skin.

These are the characteristics of three races. The copper-coloured complexion shows the Indian blood. The others are the mixed races of negroes and whites. It is known that the poor remains of Indian races have been in many cases forced into slavery. It is no less certain that white children have sometimes been kidnapped and sold into slavery. Rev. George Bourne, of Virginia, Presbyterian minister, who wrote against slavery there as early as 1816, gives an account of a boy who was stolen from his parents at seven years of age, immersed in a tan-vat to change his complexion, tattooed and sold, and, after a captivity of fourteen years, succeeded in escaping. The tanning process is not necessary now, as a fair skin is no presumption against slavery. There is reason to think that the grandmother of poor Emily Russell was a white child, stolen by kidnappers. That kidnappers may steal and sell white children at the South now, is evident from these advertisements.

The writer, within a week, has seen a fugitive quadroon mother, who had with her two children--a boy of ten months, and a girl of three years. Both were surpassingly fair, and uncommonly beautiful. The girl had blue eyes and golden hair. The mother and those children were about to be sold for the division of an estate, which was the reason why she fled. When the mind once becomes familiarized with the process of slavery-- of enslaving first black, then Indian, then mulatto, then quadroon, and when blue eyes and golden hair are advertised as properties of negroes--what protection will there be for poor white people, especially as under the present fugitive law they can be carried away without a jury trial?

A Governor of South Carolina openly declared, in 1835, that the labouring population of any country, bleached or unbleached, were a dangerous element, unless reduced to slavery. Will not this be the result, then?
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