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Jane Austen
Quotations



"Where so many hours have been spent in convincing myself that I am right, is there not some reason to fear I may be wrong?"
 
"I had a very pleasant evening, however, though you will probably find out that there was no particular reason for it; but I do not think it worth while to wait for enjoyment until there is some real opportunity for it."
- Letter to Cassandra, 1799
 
"I could no more write a [historical] romance than an epic poem. I could not sit seriously down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life; and if it were indispensable for me to keep it up and never relax into laughing at myself or other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter."
- Letter to Mr. Clarke, 1816
 
"I sent my answer... which I wrote without much effort, for I was rich, and the rich are always respectable, whatever be their style of writing."
- Letter to Cassandra, 1808
 
"By the bye, as I must leave off being young, I find many Douceurs in being a sort of chaperon [at dances], for I am put on the Sofa near the Fire & can drink as much wine as I like."
- Letter to Cassandra, 1813
 
"Expect a most agreeable letter, for not being overburdened with subject (having nothing at all to say), I shall have no check to my genius from beginning to end."
- Letter to Cassandra, 1801
 
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