HumanitiesWeb.org - A E Housman - Classical Scholar and Poet [Quotations]
HumanitiesWeb HumanitiesWeb
WelcomeHistoryLiteratureArtMusicPhilosophyResourcesHelp
Periods Alphabetically Nationality Topics Themes Genres Glossary
pixel

Housman
Index
Biography
Selected Works
Quotations
Suggested Reading
Chronology
Related Materials

Search

Get Your Degree!

Find schools and get information on the program that’s right for you.

Powered by Campus Explorer

& etc
FEEDBACK

(C)1998-2013
All Rights Reserved.

Site last updated
26 June, 2013

A E Housman
Quotations



"I believe that every English poet should read the English classics, master the rules of grammar before he attempts to bend or break them, travel abroad, experience the horrors of sordid passion, and - if he is lucky enough - know the love of an honest woman."

"Nature, not content with denying him the ability to think, has endowed him with the ability to write."
 
"I believe that every English poet should read the English classics, master the rules of grammar before he attempts to bend or break them, travel abroad, experience the horrors of sordid passion, and - if he is lucky enough - know the love of an honest woman."
 
"Good religious poetry . . . is likely to be most justly appreciated and most discriminately relished by the undevout."
 
"Even when poetry has a meaning, as it usually has, it may be inadvisable to draw it out . . . Perfect understanding will sometimes almost extinguish pleasure."
 
"Great literature should do some good to the reader: must quicken his perception though dull, and sharpen his discrimination though blunt, and mellow the rawness of his personal opinions."
 
"Statistics in the hands of an engineer are like a lamppost to a drunk -- they're used more for support than illumination. "
 
"Poetry is independent of meaning, a kind of ravishing nonsense."
 
"Poetry: Melody addressed to the inner chambers of the sense of hearing, to the junction between the ear and the brain."
 
"The house of delusions is cheap to build but drafty to live in."
 
"Poetry is not the thing said, but the way of saying it."
 
"Experience has taught me, when I am shaving of a morning, to keep watch over my thoughts, because if a line of poetry strays into my memory, my skin bristles so that the razor ceases to act...The seat of this sensation is the pit of the stomach."
 
"I think that to transfuse emotion--not to transmit thought but to set up in the reader's sense a vibratin corresponding to what was felt by the writer-- is the peculiar function of poetry."
 
Personae

Terms Defined

Referenced Works