HumanitiesWeb.org - John Dryden - the Supreme Lyrist [Quotations]
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John Dryden
Quotations



"Better shun the bait, than struggle in the snare."

"Let grace and goodness be the principal loadstone of thy affections. For love which hath ends, will have an end; whereas that which is founded on true virtue, will always continue."
 
"Set all things in their own peculiar place, and know that order is the greatest grace."
 
"Better shun the bait, than struggle in the snare."
 
"Love reckons hours for months, and days for years; every little absence is an age."
- Amphitryon
 
"Forgiveness to the injured does belong; they ne'er pardon who have done the wrong."
- The Conquest of Granada
 
"There is a pleasure sure in being mad, which none but madmen know!"
 
"Pains of love be sweeter far than all other pleasures are."
 
"My conversation is slow and dull; my humour saturine and reserved."
 
"In the first place, as he is the father of English poetry, I hold him in the same degree of veneration as the Grecians held Homer, or the Romans Virgil. He is a perpetual fountain of good sense; learned in all sciences; and, therefore, speaks properly on all subjects. As he knew what to say, so he knows also when to leave off; a continence which is practiced by few writers, and scarcely by any of the ancients, excepting Virgil and Horace... Chaucer followed Nature everywhere, but was never so bold to go beyond her.... He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humors (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his age. Not a single character has escaped him.... there is such a variety of game springing up before me that I am distracted in my choice, and know not which to follow. 'Tis sufficient to say, according to the proverb, that here is God's plenty."
- From the Preface to his Fables Ancient and Modern of 1700
 
"We first make our habits, and then our habits make us. "
 
"He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his age. Not a single character has escaped him.... We have our fathers and great-grand-dames all before us as they were in Chaucer's days: their general characters are still remaining in mankind, and even in England, though they are called by other names than those of monks and friars and canons and lady abbesses and nuns; for mankind is ever the same, and nothing lost out of nature though everything is altered."
 
"Cousin Swift, you will never be a poet."
 
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