HumanitiesWeb.org - Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Mystic Philosopher [Quotations]
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Quotations



"If you would stand well with a great mind, leave him with a favorable impression of yourself; if with a little mind, leave him with a favorable impression of himself."

"If you would stand well with a great mind, leave him with a favorable impression of yourself; if with a little mind, leave him with a favorable impression of himself."
 
"Works of imagination should be written in very plain language; the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain."
 
"Life is but thought."
 
"Real pain can alone cure us of imaginary ills. We feel a thousand miseries till we are lucky enough to feel misery."
 
"Truth is a good dog; but always beware of barking too close to the heels of an error, lest you get your brains kicked out."
 
"Every reform, however necessary, will by weak minds be carried to an excess which will itself need reforming."
- Biographia Literaria
 
"To the cause of Religion I solemnly devote all my best faculties--and if I wish to acquire knowledge as a philosopher and fame as a poet, I pray for grace that I may continue to feel what I now seek, that my greatest reason for wishing the one & the other, is that I may be enabled by my knowledge to defend Religion ably, and by my reputation to draw attention to the defence of it."
- After deciding in favour of taking an annuity from Josiah Wedgwood, instead of a position preaching at Shrewsbury
 
"For Truth is of a nature strangely encroaching, and ought to be kept out entirely if we are not disposed to admit her with perfect freedom. You cannot say to her, Thus far shalt thou go, and no further. Give her the least entrance, and she will never be satisfied till she has gained the entire possession. "
- From 'An Address To The Opposers of the Repeal of the Corporation and Test Acts'
 
"That willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith."
 
"Prose...words in their best order. Poetry...the best words in the best order."
 
"The primary imagination I hold to be the Living Power. "
 
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