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Mark Twain, A Biography Vol I, Part 1: 1835 - 1866
by Paine, Albert Bigelow


MARK TWAIN
A BIOGRAPHY
THE PERSONAL AND LITERARY LIFE OF
SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS
BY
ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE

TO
CLARA CLEMENS GABRILOWITSCH
WHO STEADILY UPHELD THE
AUTHOR'S PURPOSE TO WRITE
HISTORY RATHER THAN EULOGY AS
THE STORY OF HER FATHER'S LIFE

AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Dear William Dean Howells, Joseph Hopkins Twichell, Joseph T. Goodman, and other old friends of Mark Twain:

I cannot let these volumes go to press without some grateful word to you who have helped me during the six years and more that have gone to their making.

First, I want to confess how I have envied you your association with Mark Twain in those days when you and he "went gipsying, a long time ago." Next, I want to express my wonder at your willingness to give me so unstintedly from your precious letters and memories, when it is in the nature of man to hoard such treasures, for himself and for those who follow him. And, lastly, I want to tell you that I do not envy you so much, any more, for in these chapters, one after another, through your grace, I have gone gipsying with you all. Neither do I wonder now, for I have come to know that out of your love for him grew that greater unselfishness (or divine selfishness, as he himself might have termed it), and that nothing short of the fullest you could do for his memory would have contented your hearts.

My gratitude is measureless; and it is world-wide, for there is no land so distant that it does not contain some one who has eagerly contributed to the story. Only, I seem so poorly able to put my thanks into words.

Albert Bigelow Paine.

PREFATORY NOTE

Certain happenings as recorded in this work will be found to differ materially from the same incidents and episodes as set down in the writings of Mr. Clemens himself. Mark Twain's spirit was built of the very fabric of truth, so far as moral intent was concerned, but in his earlier autobiographical writings--and most of his earlier writings were autobiographical--he made no real pretense to accuracy of time, place, or circumstance--seeking, as he said, "only to tell a good story"--while in later years an ever-vivid imagination and a capricious memory made history difficult, even when, as in his so-called "Autobiography," his effort was in the direction of fact.

"When I was younger I could remember anything, whether it happened or not," he once said, quaintly, "but I am getting old, and soon I shall remember only the latter."

The reader may be assured, where discrepancies occur, that the writer of this memoir has obtained his data from direct and positive sources: letters, diaries, accountbooks, or other immediate memoranda; also from the concurring testimony of eye-witnesses, supported by a unity of circumstance and conditions, and not from hearsay or vagrant printed items.

I. Ancestors
II. The Fortunes of John and Jane Clemens
III. A Humble Birthplace
IV. Beginning of a Long Journey
V. The Way of Fortune
VI. A New Home
VII. The Little Town of Hannibal
VIII. The Farm
IX. School-Days
X. Early Vicissitude and Sorrow
XI. Days of Education
XII. Tom Sawyer's Band
XIII. The Gentler Side
XIV. The Passing of John Clemens
XV. A Young Ben Franklin
XVI. The Turning-Point
XVII. The Hannibal "Journal"
XVIII. The Beginning of a Literary Life
XIX. In the Footsteps of Franklin
XX. Keokuk Days
XXI. Scotchman Named MacFarlane
XXII. The Old Call of the River
XXIII. The Supreme Science
XXIV. The River Curriculum
XXV. Love-Making and Adventure
XXVI. The Tragedy of the "Pennsylvania"
XVII. The Pilot
XVIII. Piloting and Prophecy
XXIX. The End of Piloting
XXX. The Soldier
XXXI. Over the Hills and Far Away
XXXII. The Pioneer
XXXIII. The Prospector
XXXIV. Territorial Characteristics
XXXV. The Miner
XXXVI. Last Mining Days
XXXVII. The New Estate
XXXVIII. One of the "Staff"
XXXIX. Philosophy and Poetry
XL. "Mark Twain"
XLI. The Cream of Comstock Humor
XLII. Reportorial Days
XLIII. Artemus Ward
XLIV. Governor of the "Third House"
XLV. A Comstock Duel
XLVI. Getting Settled in San Francisco
XLVII. Bohemian Days
XLVIII. The Refuge of the Hills
XLIX. The Jumping Frog
L. Back to the Tumult
LI. The Corner-Stone
LII. A Commission to the Sandwich Islands
LIII. Anson Burlingame and the "Hornet" Disaster
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