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Mussolini's Futurism
The magazine Le Figaro dated 20 February, 1909, published an article by Filippo Marinetti (an Italian poet and later friend of Mussolini) in which he talked about heroism and the glory of war, and came up with the term Futurism to describe the type of art he espoused. In essence he wanted to see machines and figures in motion together in "universal dynamism". Earnest manifestos were pulbished explaining the theories further and the "Manifest of Futurist Painting" was signed by Umberto Boccioni, the most influenctial of the Futurists, Carlo Carrą, Biacomo Balla, and Gino Severini. The Futurist Exhibition was assembled and opened in Paris, where it caused a great scandal. It then continued around Europe causing riots virtually wherever it opened. Ironically, the movement petered out when its leading light, Boccioni, died in 1916 of wounds recieved in the Great War.

Contributed by Gifford, Katya
7 April 2002

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