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Excerpt from Mark Twain, A Biography Vol II, Part 2
From CLXII. Browning, Meredith, and Meisterschaft

He [Twain] read his favorite books over and over with an everchanging point of view. He re-read Carlyle's French Revolution during the summer at the farm, and to Howells he wrote:

How stunning are the changes which age makes in man while he sleeps! When I finished Carlyle's French Revolution in 1871 I was a Girondin; every time I have read it since I have read it differently--being influenced & changed, little by little, by life & environment (& Taine & St. Simon); & now I lay the book down once more, & recognize that I am a Sansculotte!--And not a pale, characterless Sansculotte, but a Marat. Carlyle teaches no such gospel, so the change is in me--in my vision of the evidences.

Contributed by Paine, Albert Bigelow

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