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Woodrow Wilson As I Know Him
Appendix "C"
by Tumulty, Joseph P.


THE WHITE HOUSE,
  WASHINGTON

24 April, 1919.

PRESIDENT WILSON,
  Paris.

As we see it from this distance, the selfish designs of Japan are as
indefensible as are those of Italy. The two situations appear to parallel
each other in their bearing upon the fate of weak and helpless nations.
Would it not be an opportune time to cast another die, this one in the
direction of Japan, that the whole world may know once and for all where
America stands upon this, the greatest issue of the peace we are trying to
make? Now is the time to use your heavy artillery and emphasize the danger
of secret treaties and selfish designs of certain big nations.

TUMULTY.

       *       *       *       *       *

Received at The White House, Washington,
  11:48 A.M.

April 26, 1919.

Paris.
TUMULTY,
  White House,
  Washington.

Am very grateful for your message of approval about the Japanese business.
It has warmed my heart mightily. The difficulties here would have been
incredible to me before I got here. Your support kept me in heart.

WOODROW WILSON.

       *       *       *       *       *

THE WHITE HOUSE,
  WASHINGTON

26 April, 1919.

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,
  Paris.

It appears to me from this end that the Japanese demands will soon produce
another crisis. If such a crisis arises, I hope you will in any statement
you make emphasize again America's purpose and her unwillingness to
consent to any imperialistic peace. The whole country will be with you in
this matter as never before. I think that your Italian statement was the
beginning of a real peace and a real league of nations.

TUMULTY.

       *       *       *       *       *

Received at The White House, Washington,
  April 29, 1919.

Paris.
TUMULTY,
  White House, Washington.

Situation still difficult. President putting up great fight against odds.
Japanese claims now under discussion.

GRAYSON.

       *       *       *       *       *

Paris.

Received at The White House, Washington.
  April 30, 1919.

TUMULTY,
  White House, Washington.

Japanese situation hanging by a thread. They are in conference now. These
are terrible days for the President physically and otherwise.

GRAYSON.

       *       *       *       *       *

Received at The White House, Washington,
  May 1, 1919.

Paris.
TUMULTY,
  White House, Washington.

The solution of the Kiauchau question is regarded here both generally and
by special friends of China, like Charles R. Crane, as remarkably
favourable and fortunate considering its rotten and complicated past and
the tangle of secret treaties in which she was enmeshed and from which she
had to be extricated. It is regarded as a wonderful victory for the
President. The Japanese themselves admit that they have made far greater
concessions than they had even dreamed would be required of them. The
Chinese agreed that they have great confidence in their interests being
safeguarded in every way and they appreciate that the League of Nations
eventually will look after them.

GRAYSON.

       *       *       *       *       *

THE WHITE HOUSE,
  WASHINGTON

1 May, 1919.

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,
  Paris.

I have not made use of the Japanese statement but am keeping my ear to the
ground and waiting. My feeling is that an attempt to explain the
compromise when no demand is made, would weaken our position instead of
strengthening it. I will therefore do nothing about the Japanese matter
unless you insist. It would help if I could unofficially say: First, the
date of your probable return to this country; Second, whether tour country
to discuss the League of Nations is possible. The adoption of the labour
programme as part of the peace programme is most important, but not enough
emphasis is being placed upon it. Could you not make a statement of some
kind that we could use here, showing the importance of this programme as
helping toward the stabilization of labour conditions throughout the
world?

TUMULTY.

       *       *       *       *       *

THE WHITE HOUSE,
  WASHINGTON

2 May, 1919.

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,
  Paris.

Sympathetic editorial New York World reference Japanese settlement. I
have not given out statement as yet. It does not look now as if any would
be necessary.

TUMULTY.

       *       *       *       *       *

Received at The White House, Washington,
  2 May, 1919.

London.
TUMULTY,
  White House, Washington.

Am perfectly willing to have you use your discretion about the use you
make of what I sent you about the Chinese-Japanese settlement. Sorry I
cannot predict the date of my return though I think it will be by June
first. Am expecting to make a tour of the country but even that is
impossible to predict with certainty.

WOODROW WILSON.

       *       *       *       *       *

THE WHITE HOUSE,
  WASHINGTON

4 May, 1919.

GRAYSON,
  Care President Wilson, Paris.

Papers here very critical of Japanese settlement. Chinese statement given
great publicity.

TUMULTY.


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